Monday, April 30, 2007

General Trivia Questions #517-522

Question 517: Entertainment & Food -- Burger Burg

In what city did James McLamore and David Edgerton open the first Burger King in 1954?

a) Colorado Springs, Colorado
b) Indianapolis, Indiana
c) Miami, Florida
d) Sacramento, California

Question 518: History & Government -- Custer's Bluster

In which future U.S. state did Custer make his famous Last Stand?

a) Montana
b) North Dakota
c) Oklahoma
d) Texas

Question 519: Math & Science -- Dream Discovery

What molecule's symmetrical structure did Fredrich A. Kekule discover in a dream in 1865?

a) Ammonia
b) Benzene
c) Ozone
d) Water

Question 520: Geography & Nature -- Potato Place

What Kansas city's name means "potato" in the Kansa language?

a) Abeline
b) Omaha
c) Topeka
d) Wichita

Question 521: Literature & Arts -- Drink to Think

What author confessed, "My stories written when sober are stupid"?

a) Arthur Conan Doyle
b) Ernest Hemingway
c) F. Scott Fitzgerald
d) Leo Tolstoy

Question 522: Sports & Games -- Still Just a Hill

How tall is the pitcher's mound in Major League Baseball?

a) 6 inches
b) 10 inches
c) 14 inches
d) 18 inches

General Trivia Answers #511-516

Answer 511: Entertainment & Food -- Band Aid Solution

b) Ethiopia

The original "Do They Know It's Christmas?" raised $14 million for famine relief, and Bob Geldof was knighted for his work. Sequels were released in 1989 and 2004.

Answer 512: History & Government -- Duopoly Destroyer

a) Andrew Jackson

The seventh President was born in the backwoods of South Carolina on March 15, 1767.

Answer 513: Math & Science -- Prescription Pits

a) Apricots

In 1974, the American Cancer Society called Laetrile use "quackery", and the FDA has not approved its use.

Answer 514: Geography & Nature -- Middle America

c) South Dakota

The exact middle lies seventeen miles west of Castle Rock in Butte County, having nudged west only six miles when Hawaii joined.

Answer 515: Literature & Arts -- Top of the Comics

d) Garry Trudeau

Doonesbury captured the 1975 award for editorial cartooning. "Doone" is school slang for "someone who is not afraid to look foolish".

Answer 516: Sports & Games -- Building a Bettor Vocabulary

a) Exacta

A quinella is like an exacta but allows either order. A perfecta requires predicting the first three finishers in order, and a trifecta three in any order.

Sunday, April 29, 2007

General Trivia Questions #511-516

Question 511: Entertainment & Food -- Band Aid Solution

What country was Band Aid's 1984 record produced to raise money for?

a) Bangladesh
b) Ethiopia
c) Kenya
d) Morocco

Question 512: History & Government -- Duopoly Destroyer

Who was the first U.S. President who was not from Massachusetts or Virginia?

a) Andrew Jackson
b) James Madison
c) James Polk
d) Martin Van Buren

Question 513: Math & Science -- Prescription Pits

From what fruit's pits is the controversial cancer-treating drug Laetrile made?

a) Apricots
b) Nectarines
c) Peaches
d) Plums

Question 514: Geography & Nature -- Middle America

In which state is the geographic center of the United States located?

a) Montana
b) North Dakota
c) South Dakota
d) Wyoming

Question 515: Literature & Arts -- Top of the Comics

Who was the first cartoonist to win a Pulitzer Prize for a comic strip?

a) Al Capp
b) Berke Breathed
c) Charles Schulz
d) Garry Trudeau

Question 516: Sports & Games -- Building a Bettor Vocabulary

What is the horse race betting term for picking the first and second place finishers in a race in the correct order?

a) Exacta
b) Perfecta
c) Quinella
d) Trifecta

U.S. Airports - Random Trivia Answers

  • A1) Boston, Massachusetts. Lt. General Edward Lawrence Logan was a Spanish-American War hero.
  • A2) Phoenix, Arizona. Curiously, although the airport code is PHX, the 'X' is not from the last letter of the city's name. The original set of three-letter airport codes was created by adding the letter 'X' to the two-letter weather station codes (LAX in Los Angeles doesn't refer to the calm attitude of the locals either).
  • A3) Newark, New Jersey. The code couldn't start with an 'N' because the U.S. Navy reserved that initial letter for its airports.
  • A4) Washington, D.C. Washington National Airport can be considered "District of Columbia Airport"), and Dulles International Airport's letters were rearranged to avoid confusion between DCA and DIA.
  • A5) Wichita, Kansas. The initial letters 'W' and 'K' were reserved for radio stations (why you'd confuse a radio station with an airport is beyond me). Kalamazoo-Battle Creek International Airport is abbreviated AZO for the same reason.
  • A6) Chicago, Illinois. The full names are Midway Airport and O'Hare International Airport (formerly known as Orchard Field Airport).
  • A7) Alabama. Birmingham and Huntsville are abbreviated in less than obvious ways.
  • A8) Connecticut (Bradley International Airport). Lt. Eugene M. Bradley was the first fatality in 1941 shortly after the U.S. Army created the airport. The airport was passed on to the state after World War II, and commercial flights began in 1947.
  • A9) Atlanta, Georgia. William B. Hartsfield and Maynard H. Jackson were former mayors responsible for building and modernizing the airport respectively. Jackson was the city's first African-American mayor in 1974.
  • A10) New Orleans, Louisiana. Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport was formerly known as Moisant Field, which was built at the Moisant Stock Yards.
  • A11) Portland, Oregon. The full names are Hillsboro Airport and Portland International Airport.
  • A12) Austin, Texas. Austin native Capt. John A. E. Bergstrom was killed during World War II.

Saturday, April 28, 2007

U.S. Airports - Random Trivia Questions

This post was inspired by my last big trip, an adventure worthy of Planes, Trains, and Automobiles (4 car rides, 3 plane flights, 5 tram trips, 2 shuttle van excursions, 1 shuttle bus shuffle, 3 subway jaunts, and 1 bus route leg to get from my sister's house back to my own home over a 48-hour period). With a tasty thought to Midwest Airlines' fresh-baked chocolate chip cookies, here are a dozen questions about U.S. airports.

U.S. Airports Questions

  • Q1) An easy starter question: my home airport is Logan International Airport. What city is that in?
  • Q2) My destination airport was Sky Harbor International. What city did I travel to?
  • Q3) On the way home, I got stranded at the airport whose code is EWR. Where was I stuck overnight?
  • Q4) (This question and the rest refer to airports that I didn't visit this time.) What city is served by airports whose codes are DCA and IAD?
  • Q5) What city's airport code is ICT?
  • Q6) What city is served by airports whose codes are MDW and ORD?
  • Q7) Which state's international airports are BHM and HSV?
  • Q8) Which state's international airport is BRD?
  • Q9) What city is served by Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport?
  • Q10) What city's airport code is MSY?
  • Q11) What city's airport codes are HIO and PDX?
  • Q12) What capital city is home to Bergstrom International Airport?

Herbie's Spaceship -- Quiz Quilt 17 Solution

Category Answers:
Sports
&
Games
RICHARDMontreal Canadien right winger Maurice Richard scored exactly 50 times in 50 games in 1944-45.
Math
&
Science
MORPHINEThe addictive pain killer was named for Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams.
Literature
&
Arts
ORCZYThe pimpernel is a flower that the title character of Baroness Orczy's novel, the leader of secret society, uses as his sign in messages.
Entertainment
&
Food
PICKETTWilson Pickett's version was released in 1969, one year after the Beatles.
Geography
&
Nature
RAINIERIn 1792, Captain George Vancouver of the British Royal Navy dedicated the 14,410-foot Mount Rainier to his friend Rear Admiral Peter Rainier, not the prevailing weather.
History
&
Government
MINUITIn 1626, governor Peter Minuit traded the natives $24 worth of trinkets, beads, and knives.

Quiz Quilt Answer: ROCKIT (Diagonal)

Herbie Hancock won a Grammy for Best R&B Instrumental for "Rock It" from his 1983 Future Shock album.

Friday, April 27, 2007

Herbie's Spaceship -- Quiz Quilt 17 Puzzle

Category Questions:
Sports
&
Games
Who was the first NHL player to score 50 goals in a season?
Math
&
Science
What drug was isolated from opium in the 18th century?
Literature
&
Arts
What author focused on the French Revolution in The Scarlet Pimpernel in 1903?
Entertainment
&
Food
What singer besides the Beatles hit the charts with "Hey Jude" in the 1960s?
Geography
&
Nature
What volcano is Washington state's highest point?
History
&
Government
What Dutchman purchased Manhattan Island from the Algonquins?

General Trivia Answers #505-510

Answer 505: Entertainment & Food -- Dolly Power

c) Dollywood

The Pigeon Forge, Tennessee entertainment park was renamed from Silver Dollar City in 1986.

Answer 506: History & Government -- Manifest Destiny

c) Louisiana Purchase

The 1803 transaction grew the U.S. by 828,000 square miles, about one-fourth more than Alaska did.

Answer 507: Math & Science -- Your 2000 Body Parts

d) Tonsils

The lymphatic tissue traps inhaled viruses and produces antibodies as part of the body's immune system.

Answer 508: Geography & Nature -- Two Dry

a) Arabian Desert

Spread out over 900,000 square miles, the Middle East region is just over one-fourth the size of the Sahara.

Answer 509: Literature & Arts -- Baby Belle

c) Emily Dickinson

The poet was born in Amherst, Massachusetts on December 10, 1830 and died there on May 15, 1886. Her grandfather Samuel helped found Amherst College in 1821.

Answer 510: Sports & Games -- Marked Man

d) Yellow

Tour founder Henri Desgrange came up with the idea during the 1919 race, selecting the color of the tour's chief sponsor L'Auto's newspaper pages.

Thursday, April 26, 2007

General Trivia Questions #505-510

Question 505: Entertainment & Food -- Dolly Power

What is the name of Dolly Parton's theme park?

a) Dollyland
b) Dollyville
c) Dollywood
d) Dollyworld

Question 506: History & Government -- Manifest Destiny

What was the United States' largest single land acquisition?

a) Alaska
b) Gadsden Purchase
c) Louisiana Purchase
d) Mexican Cessation

Question 507: Math & Science -- Your 2000 Body Parts

What is the common name for the adenoids?

a) Adam's apples
b) Earlobes
c) Temples
d) Tonsils

Question 508: Geography & Nature -- Two Dry

What is the second largest desert in the world, after the Sahara Desert?

a) Arabian Desert
b) Gobi Desert
c) Kalahari Desert
d) Libyan Desert

Question 509: Literature & Arts -- Baby Belle

What author was known as the Belle of Amherst?

a) Alice Walker
b) Anna Sewell
c) Emily Dickinson
d) Jane Austen

Question 510: Sports & Games -- Marked Man

What color jersey does the leader in the Tour de France wear?

a) Green
b) Red
c) White
d) Yellow

General Trivia Answers #499-504

Answer 499: Entertainment & Food -- Can't Win 'Em All

b) It's a Wonderful Life

Capra lost to William Wyler and The Best Years of Our Lives in 1946.

Answer 500: History & Government -- The Candidate Who Never Lied

c) Pig

The Yippie candidate was named Pigasus.

Answer 501: Math & Science -- Raining Rocks

c) 500 pounds

Most meteorites are very small by the time they get through the atmosphere, but about 500 baseball-size or larger rocks hit the ground each year.

Answer 502: Geography & Nature -- Water Country

c) Tuvalu

The colony had been combined with the Gilbert Islands by the British but split in 1974 and became an independent country four years later.

Answer 503: Literature & Arts -- Something Old and Something Borrowed

b) Czech Republic

The National Library opened in Prague as part of Charles University in 1366.

Answer 504: Sports & Games -- Not the Littler Sittler

b) 10

The Toronto Maple Leafs center netted 6 goals and assisted on 4 others against the Boston Bruins.

Wednesday, April 25, 2007

General Trivia Questions #499-504

Question 499: Entertainment & Food -- Can't Win 'Em All

Which is the only movie below for which Frank Capra did not win a Best Director Academy Award?

a) It Happened One Night
b) It's a Wonderful Life
c) Mr. Deeds Goes to Town
d) You Can't Take It With You

Question 500: History & Government -- The Candidate Who Never Lied

What type of animal did the Youth International Party nominate for President at the Democratic Convention in Chicago in 1968?

a) Goat
b) Monkey
c) Pig
d) Sheep

Question 501: Math & Science -- Raining Rocks

How many pounds of meteorites strike the Earth every day on average?

a) 5 pounds
b) 50 pounds
c) 500 pounds
d) 5,000 pounds

Question 502: Geography & Nature -- Water Country

What country was formerly known as the Ellice Islands?

a) Fiji
b) Samoa
c) Tuvalu
d) Vanuatu

Question 503: Literature & Arts -- Something Old and Something Borrowed

What country has the oldest national library?

a) Austria
b) Czech Republic
c) France
d) Italy

Question 504: Sports & Games -- Not the Littler Sittler

How many points did Darryl Sittler score in a game on February 7, 1976 to set an NHL record?

a) 9
b) 10
c) 11
d) 12

General Trivia Answers #493-498

Answer 493: Entertainment & Food -- William and Williams

a) Father's Day

Their characters, Dale Putley and Jack Lawrence, dated the same woman and either might be the father of her missing son.

Answer 494: History & Government -- State Patron

c) Scotland

St. Peter's brother is also the patron saint of Russia and Romania.

Answer 495: Math & Science -- Kill Me in Philly

b) Legionnaire's disease

The disease was named for an unlucky convention for ex-service personnel in Philadelphia.

Answer 496: Geography & Nature -- Tops for Crops

d) Ukraine

The country has many fertile plains to support agriculture.

Answer 497: Literature & Arts -- A While in Exile

a) The Dalai Lama

The book was published in 1990, over thirty years after the 14th Dalai Lama was forced into exile following a Chinese takeover of Tibet.

Answer 498: Sports & Games -- Cup Holders

a) Edmonton Oilers

Wayne Gretzky led the team to four championships, and they added another after he departed to break a tie with the New York Islanders.

Tuesday, April 24, 2007

General Trivia Questions #493-498

Question 493: Entertainment & Food -- William and Williams

What holiday is the title of a 1997 movie starring Robin Williams as a writer and Billy Crystal as an attorney?

a) Father's Day
b) Labor Day
c) Memorial Day
d) Veteran's Day

Question 494: History & Government -- State Patron

What nation's patron saint is Andrew?

a) England
b) Ireland
c) Scotland
d) Wales

Question 495: Math & Science -- Kill Me in Philly

On August 4, 1976, what did 29 people in Philadelphia contract and eventually die from?

a) E. coli
b) Legionnaire's disease
c) Salmonella
d) Smallpox

Question 496: Geography & Nature -- Tops for Crops

What Southeast European country was once known as the Breadbasket of the Soviet Union?

a) Belarus
b) Georgia
c) Moldova
d) Ukraine

Question 497: Literature & Arts -- A While in Exile

Whose autobiography is called Freedom in Exile?

a) The Dalai Lama
b) Mahatma Gandhi
c) Nelson Mandela
d) Washington Irving

Question 498: Sports & Games -- Cup Holders

Which NHL team won the most Stanley Cups from 1980 to 1990?

a) Edmonton Oilers
b) Montreal Canadiens
c) New York Islanders
d) Pittsburgh Penguins

General Trivia Answers #487-492

Answer 487: Entertainment & Food -- Rejuvenated Rocky

d) 6

The first five movies in the inspirational series ran from Rocky in 1976 to Rocky V in 1990, followed by a sixteen year gap before Rocky Balboa.

Answer 488: History & Government -- Blasted Blastoff

b) Challenger

The flight lasted only 73 seconds.

Answer 489: Math & Science -- Metal Measure

b) 12

The Troy weight system was named for the French city of Troyes about a thousand years ago.

Answer 490: Geography & Nature -- Nobel City

d) Stockholm, Sweden

Except for the initial awards in 1901, the king of Sweden has presented the Nobel Prizes each year.

Answer 491: Literature & Arts -- Verses vs. Hearses

d) Muslim

Rushdie went into hiding after Ayatollah Khomeini ordered his death for the book.

Answer 492: Sports & Games -- Kuerten's Country

b) Brazil

The former #1-ranked player was born in Florianopolis, Brazil on September 10, 1976.

Monday, April 23, 2007

General Trivia Questions #487-492

Question 487: Entertainment & Food -- Rejuvenated Rocky

How many Rocky movies has Sylvester Stallone starred in?

a) 3
b) 4
c) 5
d) 6

Question 488: History & Government -- Blasted Blastoff

What space shuttle exploded on January 28, 1986?

a) Atlantis
b) Challenger
c) Columbia
d) Enterprise

Question 489: Math & Science -- Metal Measure

How many Troy ounces are in a pound of gold?

a) 10
b) 12
c) 14
d) 16

Question 490: Geography & Nature -- Nobel City

What city is the home of the Nobel Institute?

a) Copenhagen, Denmark
b) Helsinki, Finland
c) Oslo, Norway
d) Stockholm, Sweden

Question 491: Literature & Arts -- Verses vs. Hearses

What religious group did Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses offend the most?

a) Catholic
b) Jewish
c) Mormon
d) Muslim

Question 492: Sports & Games -- Kuerten's Country

What country is tennis player Gustavo Kuerten from?

a) Argentina
b) Brazil
c) Colombia
d) Ecuador

General Trivia Answers #481-486

Answer 481: Entertainment & Food -- Fast Food, Slow Case

b) McDonald's

After 314 days, activists were found guilty of libel for passing out six-page flyers titled "What's Wrong With McDonald's" in 1989.

Answer 482: History & Government -- Low Honors

a) Baron

The title is just below viscount.

Answer 483: Math & Science -- Opposite of Hydrogen

d) Radon

The noble gas's atomic number is 86, one more than the halogen astatine.

Answer 484: Geography & Nature -- American Pine-Apple

b) Michigan

It even has a state stone, the petoskey stone, and a state soil, the kalkaska soil series.

Answer 485: Literature & Arts -- Perennial Periodical

c) Scientific American

The science journal debuted in 1845, a year before Town & Country.

Answer 486: Sports & Games -- Lose the Battle, Win the War

a) Greg LeMond

The 29-year-old became the fifth to accomplish the feat in 1990.

Sunday, April 22, 2007

General Trivia Questions #481-486

Question 481: Entertainment & Food -- Fast Food, Slow Case

Which fast food chain was involved in the longest court case in British history?

a) Kentucky Fried Chicken
b) McDonald's
c) Pizza Hut
d) Taco Bell

Question 482: History & Government -- Low Honors

Which is the lowest British peerage rank?

a) Baron
b) Earl
c) Marquis
d) Viscount

Question 483: Math & Science -- Opposite of Hydrogen

What is the chemical element with the highest atomic number whose name does not end in "-ium"?

a) Astatine
b) Bismuth
c) Lead
d) Radon

Question 484: Geography & Nature -- American Pine-Apple

What is the U.S. state whose official tree is the white pine, flower is the apple blossom, and bird is the American robin?

a) Idaho
b) Michigan
c) Vermont
d) Washington

Question 485: Literature & Arts -- Perennial Periodical

What is the longest-running U.S. magazine?

a) The Atlantic
b) Harper's
c) Scientific American
d) Town & Country

Question 486: Sports & Games -- Lose the Battle, Win the War

Who was the last bicyclist to win the Tour de France without capturing a single stage?

a) Greg LeMond
b) Jan Ullrich
c) Lance Armstrong
d) Miguel Indurain

Moving Day - Random Trivia Answers

  • A1) The Jeffersons. Actress Ja'net Du Bois, who played neighbor Willona Woods, performed the theme song with a gospel choir.
  • A2) Twyla Tharp. The title track's Anthony and many other Long Islanders appear in the loosely connected plot. One unusual feature of this "musical" is that the actors don't sing and the singers don't act.
  • A3) Douglas MacArthur. Mac did not disappoint his mom, graduating first out of 93 people in his class in 1903.
  • A4) Illinois. The Great Communicator debuted as Andy McCaine in Love Is in the Air the same year.
  • A5) Teflon. Polytetrafluoroethylene, abbreviated PTFE, has the lowest coefficient of friction of any known solid. The fluoropolymer is used to coat non-stick cookware but scratches and wears out fairly easily.
  • A6) 40 miles per hour. The momentum of an object is its mass times its velocity, and the principle of conservation of momentum states that the sum of the incoming momentums equals the sum of the outgoing momentums (10*20 + 5*0 = 10*0 + 5*40).
  • A7) Lagos. The decision to move the capital had been made fifteen years earlier, with the intervening time used to build the new city.
  • A8) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The city housed the First and Second Continental Congresses and served as the U.S. capital under the Articles of Confederation from March 1, 1781 to June 21, 1783 and under the Constitution from December 6, 1790 to May 14, 1800.
  • A9) Lithuania. The story about 19th-century Chicago publicized the horrible working conditions and helped spur the passing of the Meat Inspection Act and the Pure Food and Drug Act that created the Food and Drug Administration.
  • A10) California. The Joad family escapes the Dust Bowl only to find life just as difficult as sharecroppers.
  • A11) Quebec. The Nordiques joined the WHA in 1972 and the NHL in 1979. The team won the Avco Cup in 1977 but never reached the Stanley Cup finals before moving.
  • A12) Oakland Raiders. The team moved to Los Angeles in 1982, after owner Al Davis successfully sued the NFL to allow the relocation, but came back to Oakland in 1994. The franchise has won three Super Bowls, twice during its first stay in Oakland and once while in Los Angeles.

Saturday, April 21, 2007

Moving Day - Random Trivia Questions

Not counting the beginning and end of each school year in college, I haven't moved very often in my life and never very far (about 180 miles total). Which is a good thing because each time I've had more and more junk to pack, transport, and unpack. The last time added all of my wife's stuff. The next time would include two kids' belongings also, except that I sincerely doubt we'll be going anywhere until they're out of the house and in college.

This week will be a very painless move as the Trivia Why's blog completes its four-month transition from Blogstream (old home since 2005) to Blogger (new home in 2007). Welcome to all of my loyal readers from Blogstream!

Moving Day Questions

  • Q1) What sitcom's theme song was called "Movin' on Up"?
  • Q2) What choreographer transformed Billy Joel's "Movin' Out" and 25 of his other songs into a Broadway musical in 2002?
  • Q3) What future general's mother moved into an apartment overlooking his West Point dormitory to make sure he studied?
  • Q4) What U.S. state was Ronald Reagan born and raised in before he moved to California and became an actor?
  • Q5) What solid material is the easiest for an object to move across?
  • Q6) In a frictionless, elastic collision between a 10-ounce ball moving at 20 miles per hour and a stationary 5-ounce ball with the same radius, how fast will the smaller ball move after a direct hit that brings the heavier ball to a stop?
  • Q7) What was the capital of Nigeria before the government moved to Abuja in 1991?
  • Q8) Which city served as the U.S. capital just before the government moved to Washington, D.C. in 1800?
  • Q9) In Upton Sinclair's novel The Jungle, what country had the main couple moved to the U.S. from?
  • Q10) What state does the main family in John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath move from Oklahoma to?
  • Q11) In what city did the Colorado Avalanche play hockey in before they moved to Denver in 1995?
  • Q12) What was the only NFL team to move away from a city and then later return?

Frozen Phoenix -- Quiz Quilt 16 Solution

Category Answers:
Math
&
Science
ANTHRACITEThe mineral burns cleanly and efficiently with an almost invisible flame.
Sports
&
Games
MOROCCOIn 2003, the pair helped their country win its way back into the Davis Cup World Group, accounting for all the team's wins against Italy and Great Britain.
History
&
Government
GERMANY"Dutch" is an alternate spelling of "Deutsch", meaning "German".
Geography
&
Nature
MERCATORMerchant Gerardus Mercator devised the Mercator projection in 1568 and devised a method to mass-produce globes.
Entertainment
&
Food
TRUMPETThe jazz musician's mother was a pianist and wanted him to learn to tickle the ivories, but his father gave him a trumpet as a 13th-birthday gift.
Literature
&
Arts
JUNETEENTHThe name is short for June 19, 1865, when slaves in Galveston, Texas found out about the Emancipation Proclamation two years late.

Quiz Quilt Answer: COYOTE (7th letters)

The Phoenix Coyotes play in the NHL. The team had competed as the Winnipeg Jets until 1996.

Friday, April 20, 2007

Frozen Phoenix -- Quiz Quilt 16 Puzzle

Category Questions:
Math
&
Science
What shiny, black substance is the hardest type of coal?
Sports
&
Games
What country are tennis players Karim Alami and Hicham Arazi from?
History
&
Government
What country did the Pennsylvania Dutch originally come from?
Geography
&
Nature
Who was the Flemish geographer whose conformal map projection has the meridians drawn parallel to each other?
Entertainment
&
Food
What musical instrument did Miles Davis master although he did not pick it up until he was a teenager?
Literature
&
Arts
What was Ralph Ellison's second novel, published posthumously 47 years after Invisible Man?

General Trivia Answers #475-480

Answer 475: Entertainment & Food -- Four Females

b) The Golden Girls

Bea Arthur, Betty White, Rue McClanahan, and Estelle Getty played the spunky senior citizens from 1985 to 1992.

Answer 476: History & Government -- Daredevil Daniel's Day

c) A Spiderman suit

The daredevil climbed 1,454 feet up, earning himself a place in the Guinness Book of World Records.

Answer 477: Math & Science -- Ancient Era

a) Archaeozoic Era

The time period from 3.8 to 2.5 billion years ago witnessed the formation of the Earth's crust and the evolution of the first unicellular organisms.

Answer 478: Geography & Nature -- Royalty in America

b) Cincinnati, Ohio

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow helped popularize its nickname "Queen of the West".

Answer 479: Literature & Arts -- Find the Female

a) Anais Nin

The 20th-century French writer was known for her diaries and her erotica, including the 1981 collection, Delta of Venus.

Answer 480: Sports & Games -- French Hero

b) A pilot

The World War I fighter pilot, believed to be the first ever, was shot down and killed in October 1918.

Thursday, April 19, 2007

General Trivia Questions #475-480

Question 475: Entertainment & Food -- Four Females

What television show revolves around Dorothy Zbornak, Rose Nyland, Blanche Devereaux, and Sophia Petrillo?

a) Designing Women
b) The Golden Girls
c) The Thorn Birds
d) Twin Peaks

Question 476: History & Government -- Daredevil Daniel's Day

On May 25, 1981, what was Daniel Goodwin wearing when he scaled the outside of the Sears Tower in Chicago in 7½ hours?

a) A King Kong costume
b) Nothing
c) A Spiderman suit
d) A tuxedo

Question 477: Math & Science -- Ancient Era

What is the oldest geological era?

a) Archaeozoic Era
b) Mesozoic Era
c) Paleozoic Era
d) Proterozoic Era

Question 478: Geography & Nature -- Royalty in America

What U.S. city is known as the Queen City?

a) Baltimore, Maryland
b) Cincinnati, Ohio
c) Minneapolis, Minnesota
d) Tallahassee, Florida

Question 479: Literature & Arts -- Find the Female

Who is the only female author among the following?

a) Anais Nin
b) Ezra Pound
c) Jean Genet
d) Stendhal

Question 480: Sports & Games -- French Hero

Who is the French Open's Roland Garros stadium named after?

a) A general
b) A pilot
c) A president
d) A tennis player

General Trivia Answers #469-474

Answer 469: Entertainment & Food -- Main Gangs

d) Sharks

The Romeo and Juliet-inspired musical centers on the relationship between Tony, the Jets former leader, and Maria, the sister of current Sharks leader Bernardo.

Answer 470: History & Government -- Stars & Stripes Celebration

c) June 14

The U.S. officially adopted Old Glory on that date in 1777.

Answer 471: Math & Science -- Weather Words

d) Snow

Although they have very complex structures with six-fold symmetry, identical snowflakes have been found by the National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Answer 472: Geography & Nature -- West River

c) Rhine River

Its name comes from the Celtic renos, meaning "raging flow".

Answer 473: Literature & Arts -- Longer Than a YouTube Video

c) Andy Warhol

The Pennsylvanian had a major influence on the pop art movement in the 1960s.

Answer 474: Sports & Games -- Squats and Moon Shots

d) Mike Piazza

Drafted in the 62nd round partly as a favor by Tommy Lasorda, the ten-time All-Star accomplished the feat nine straight times from 1995 to 2003.

Wednesday, April 18, 2007

General Trivia Questions #469-474

Question 469: Entertainment & Food -- Main Gangs

What gang opposes the Jets in West Side Story?

a) Coyotes
b) Devils
c) Kings
d) Sharks

Question 470: History & Government -- Stars & Stripes Celebration

On what day does the U.S. celebrate Flag Day?

a) February 4
b) May 24
c) June 14
d) July 4

Question 471: Math & Science -- Weather Words

What is the common name for precipitation formed by the sublimation of water vapor into solid crystals at temperatures below freezing?

a) Freezing rain
b) Hail
c) Sleet
d) Snow

Question 472: Geography & Nature -- West River

What is the principal river of Western Europe, flowing from Switzerland to the Netherlands?

a) Danube River
b) Elbe River
c) Rhine River
d) Seine River

Question 473: Literature & Arts -- Longer Than a YouTube Video

Who predicted, "In the future, everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes"?

a) Andy Kaufman
b) Andy Rooney
c) Andy Warhol
d) Andy Williams

Question 474: Sports & Games -- Squats and Moon Shots

What Major League Baseball catcher had the most seasons with 30 home runs?

a) Carlton Fisk
b) Ivan Rodriguez
c) Johnny Bench
d) Mike Piazza

General Trivia Answers #463-468

Answer 463: Entertainment & Food -- Airplane Accident

c) Delta Air Lines

On August 2, 1985, a thunderstorm downed Delta Flight 191 at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.

Answer 464: History & Government -- World Words

b) French

German is not one of the official languages.

Answer 465: Math & Science -- Not True Blue

d) Sky & Telescope

The phrase used to mean the fourth full moon in a season, but now it refers to the second full moon in a calendar month.

Answer 466: Geography & Nature -- Big Brains

a) Ants

Although their brains weigh only a hundredth of a gram on average, they are the heaviest of any insects and contain about 250,000 brain cells.

Answer 467: Literature & Arts -- Canine Companion

d) Wolf

Unlike Katmir of Krishna legend, Wolf did not stick around to guard his master while he slept.

Answer 468: Sports & Games -- Feline Football

b) 4

The four fierce felines are the Cincinnati Bengals, Jacksonville Jaguars, Detroit Lions, and Carolina Panthers.

Tuesday, April 17, 2007

General Trivia Questions #463-468

Question 463: Entertainment & Food -- Airplane Accident

What airline's crash sparked the 1989 movie Fire and Rain?

a) American Airlines
b) Continental Airlines
c) Delta Air Lines
d) United Airlines

Question 464: History & Government -- World Words

Which of the six official languages of the United Nations do the fewest people in the world speak?

a) Arabic
b) French
c) German
d) Spanish

Question 465: Math & Science -- Not True Blue

What magazine admitted in 1999 that it had incorrectly defined "blue moon" 53 years earlier?

a) Nature
b) Science
c) Scientific American
d) Sky & Telescope

Question 466: Geography & Nature -- Big Brains

What animal has the largest brain in proportion to its body size?

a) Ants
b) Cockroaches
c) Spiders
d) Ticks

Question 467: Literature & Arts -- Canine Companion

What was the name of Rip Van Winkle's dog?

a) Bear
b) Coyote
c) Moose
d) Wolf

Question 468: Sports & Games -- Feline Football

How many current NFL teams are named for big cats?

a) 3
b) 4
c) 5
d) 6

General Trivia Answers #457-462

Answer 457: Entertainment & Food -- Phyllis In

a) Lindstrom

Cloris Leachman played her from 1970 to 1975 and then spun off into her own concurrent show.

Answer 458: History & Government -- Harrison's Helper

c) Longitude

In 1715, John Harrison collected a reward of 20,000 pounds for developing a clock that could determine longitude to within half a degree (sixty miles).

Answer 459: Math & Science -- Rare Air

b) Ionosphere

The layer extends from 50 to 250 miles above the Earth's surface.

Answer 460: Geography & Nature -- Fake Fruit

c) Grape

The Oregon grape, named for its purple berry clusters, was selected in 1899.

Answer 461: Literature & Arts -- Poem-Tree

c) Joyce Kilmer

The lines open his 1913 poem "Trees", which Oscar Rasbach set to music in 1922.

Answer 462: Sports & Games -- Slam Ma'am

b) Juli Inkster

The Californian became the sixth woman to accomplish the quadruple.

Monday, April 16, 2007

General Trivia Questions #457-462

Question 457: Entertainment & Food -- Phyllis In

On The Mary Tyler Moore Show, what was Phyllis's last name?

a) Lindstrom
b) Morgenstern
c) Nivens
d) Richards

Question 458: History & Government -- Harrison's Helper

What was Harrison's chronometer used to measure in the 1700s?

a) Altitude
b) Latitude
c) Longitude
d) Wind speed

Question 459: Math & Science -- Rare Air

What is the highest level of the Earth's atmosphere?

a) Exosphere
b) Ionosphere
c) Mesosphere
d) Thermosphere

Question 460: Geography & Nature -- Fake Fruit

What fruit is unrelated to the similarly named plant that is the state flower of Oregon?

a) Apple
b) Cherry
c) Grape
d) Strawberry

Question 461: Literature & Arts -- Poem-Tree

What poet wrote, "I think that I shall never see a poem as lovely as a tree"?

a) Dr. Seuss
b) E.E. Cummings
c) Joyce Kilmer
d) Ogden Nash

Question 462: Sports & Games -- Slam Ma'am

What female golfer completed her career Grand Slam when she won the 1999 LPGA Championship?

a) Betsy King
b) Juli Inkster
c) Pat Bradley
d) Patty Sheehan

General Trivia Answers #451-456

Answer 451: Entertainment & Food -- Stout Black

a) Champagne

The two-layered drink was Otto von Bismarck's favorite.

Answer 452: History & Government -- War Gore

d) Russia

The Asian power lost 9.1 million people, two million more than either Germany or Austria-Hungary.

Answer 453: Math & Science -- Bevy Metal

a) Aluminum

The element accounts for 8.1% of the crust, with iron second at 5.0%.

Answer 454: Geography & Nature -- No Canada

b) Lake Michigan

Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin surround the lake.

Answer 455: Literature & Arts -- Explain Caine

d) The ship

The U.S.S. Caine is a minesweeper.

Answer 456: Sports & Games -- The Physics of Baseball

d) Down

The handedness of the pitcher is irrelevant.

Sunday, April 15, 2007

General Trivia Questions #451-456

Question 451: Entertainment & Food -- Stout Black

What type of alcohol is poured on top of Guinness stout to make a Black Velvet?

a) Champagne
b) Gin
c) Rum
d) Vodka

Question 452: History & Government -- War Gore

What country suffered the most casualties in World War I?

a) Austria-Hungary
b) France
c) Germany
d) Russia

Question 453: Math & Science -- Bevy Metal

What is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust?

a) Aluminum
b) Copper
c) Iron
d) Silver

Question 454: Geography & Nature -- No Canada

Which is the only Great Lake that is not part of the U.S.-Canada border?

a) Lake Huron
b) Lake Michigan
c) Lake Ontario
d) Lake Superior

Question 455: Literature & Arts -- Explain Caine

In The Caine Mutiny, who or what is Caine?

a) The captain
b) A coral reef
c) The leader of the mutiny
d) The ship

Question 456: Sports & Games -- The Physics of Baseball

In what general direction does a curveball break when thrown by a right-handed pitcher?

a) Left
b) Right
c) Up
d) Down

Board Games - Random Trivia Answers

  • A1) Candy Land. Locations like Molasses Swamp and Gumdrop Mountains were in the original game in 1949, but the characters were added later.
  • A2) Chutes and Ladders (or Snakes and Ladders). The current Milton Bradley game actually replaces the die with a spinner. Presumably, it's too easy to lose the die, but our spinner broke, so we're using a die from another game anyway.
  • A3) Trouble. Each player has four plastic peg pieces that they move around the board, sending opponents back to the start square by landing on them. The game is also known as Frustration and Kimble, with variations called Headache and Double Trouble.
  • A4) Stay Alive. Milton Bradley introduced this game in 1971 and spiked its popularity with the television ad featuring the quote in the description seven years later.
  • A5) Battleship. In addition to the namesake ship (four units long), each player has an aircraft carrier (5), a submarine (3), a cruiser (3), and a destroyer (2). Finding the destroyer is usually the key to winning.
  • A6) Easy Money. My friend Nelson dubbed this Milton Bradley game "Measly Money". We liked it more than Monopoly because it didn't take nearly as long to play. Confusingly, Milton Bradley released an unrelated game called Easy Money in 1988.
  • A7) The Game of Life. This Milton Bradley game dates all the way back to an 1861 version called The Checkered Game of Life featuring a spinning top and a checkerboard playing field. The game was redesigned into essentially its modern form on its 100th anniversary.
  • A8) Masterpiece. This 1970 Parker Brothers game could have helped me learn about some famous paintings (St. John the Baptist, Still Life, and American Gothic are among its two dozen pictures), but I'm sure it didn't.
  • A9) Risk. French movie director Albert Lamorisse, who won the 1957 Best Director Oscar for Le Ballon rouge, introduced this war game as La Conquete du Monde (The Conquest of the World) in the same year.
  • A10) Connect Four. Both quotes are from Milton Bradley's late 1970s television commercial showing a brother and sister playing two games.
  • A11) Stratego. The lower-numbered piece wins when a battle takes place (both are removed if they're equal), except that the Spy defeats the Marshal if it attacks first. The highest piece, the Scout, has the special ability to travel multiple spaces in one turn. Besides the flag, each side also has bombs which can only be defused by the Miners.
  • A12) Othello (also called Reversi). Mattel named its version of the game for the Shakespeare character and marketed it with the catchphrase in the description.

Saturday, April 14, 2007

Board Games - Random Trivia Questions

All of the following games were in my closet when I was a kid, and I still have some of them (now being used by my kids). Your task is to identify each game from its poetic description.

Board Games Questions

  • D1)
    Queen Frostine has been demoted, and Plumpy is no more;
    She's just a Princess, and he is now Mama Ginger Tree.
    This colorful game can be played by two, three, or four;
    It requires only counting from kids as young as three.
  • D2)
    One, two, three, count with me as you obey the die;
    Although the board goes to a hundred, there's no math.
    Bad luck, you slide down low; good luck, you climb up high;
    Or just zig-zag your way up the checkerboard path.
  • D3)
    Which Pachisi version do you like? There are so many;
    This one's got the Pop-o-matic, so you don't have to roll.
    You don't even have to count the pips; there aren't any;
    Be the first to race your pieces from the start to your goal.
  • D4)
    "I'm the sole survivor", pre-reality show;
    Place your marbles on the seven by seven grid.
    Slide one of the fourteen levers and down they go;
    If you're the last one standing, you're the winning kid.
  • D5)
    Somewhere in this ten by ten sea,
    I carefully place my five boats.
    In turn, I bomb the enemy,
    Until there's nothing left that floats.
  • D6)
    A blatant '50s Milton Bradley Monopoly clone;
    You can rent, build houses, and mortgage (but not refinance).
    It's all about money and the properties that you own;
    Give or Take cards instead of Community Chest and Chance.
  • D7)
    You're a blue or pink peg person in a small, plastic car,
    Traveling on a long and windy road through plastic hills.
    Spin the spinner, make the right decisions, and you'll go far;
    Get married, have kids, and earn hundred thousand dollar bills.
  • D8)
    Is the painting a Monet, Rembrandt, or Van Gogh,
    Or a cheap forgery by an unknown artist?
    Bid wisely, for it may cost you a lot of dough;
    To discern if you're the cleverest and smartest.
  • D9)
    Kamchatka to Alaska, North Africa to Brazil;
    Odd geographical connections on a weird world map.
    A test of your diplomacy and military skill;
    Taking over the planet has never been such a snap.
  • D10)
    "The vertical checkers game from Milton Bradley";
    Sometimes it's not just what you see, it's what you miss.
    Spot your opponent's plan, and you won't do badly;
    Otherwise you can just whine, "Pretty sneaky, sis".
  • D11)
    The army in red attacks the army in blue,
    Around and between two small bodies of water.
    The General's a one and the Marshal's a two;
    Capture the flag while avoiding total slaughter.
  • D12)
    "A minute to learn, a lifetime to master";
    Place your piece and turn the white pieces to black.
    Losing the corners could be a disaster;
    When your opponent moves and flips them all back.

Two Pints of Rocks -- Quiz Quilt 15 Solution

Category Answers:
History
&
Government
QUAKERSFox evolved his religious community from the Seekers, whom he joined in 1652.
Math
&
Science
UMBRAThe darkness can last up to seven minutes.
Literature
&
Arts
ASIMOVThe Russian-born writer Isaac Asimov moved to the U.S. at age three and began reading science fiction novels in his parents' candy store in Brooklyn.
Sports
&
Games
ROCKETSThe Houston Rockets defeated the New York Knicks in the finals in 1994 and swept the Orlando Magic in 1995 while Jordan batted .202 for the Birmingham Barons.
Entertainment
&
Food
TAYLORRip Taylor's beauty contest parody judged six contestants each week on their "beauty" and "talent".
Geography
&
Nature
ZAMBIAThe 290,000-square-mile nation has just under 10 million people.

Quiz Quilt Answer: QUARTZ (First letters)

Two pints equals a quart.

Friday, April 13, 2007

Two Pints of Rocks -- Quiz Quilt 15 Puzzle

Category Questions:
History
&
Government
What is the common name for the Religious Society of Friends, originated in England in the 17th century under George Fox?
Math
&
Science
What is the scientific term for the complete shadow that the moon casts during a solar eclipse?
Literature
&
Arts
What science fiction author wrote under the pseudonym Paul French?
Sports
&
Games
Which team won back-to-back NBA championships while Michael Jordan was playing minor league baseball?
Entertainment
&
Food
What comedian hosted The $1.98 Beauty Show in 1978 and 1979?
Geography
&
Nature
What African country is surrounded by Angola, Zaire, Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Botswana, and Namibia?

General Trivia Answers #445-450

Answer 445: Entertainment & Food -- Buffalo, Definitely Buffalo Wings

a) Berlin, Germany

The film about an angel who falls in love with a human is also known by its German title, Der Himmel uber Berlin.

Answer 446: History & Government -- Ful-phil-ling Function

c) William Taft

William McKinley appointed him to the role in 1900, nine years before he became President.

Answer 447: Math & Science -- Evolving Theory

a) Beagle

Darwin's account of the journey was published as the popular Narrative of the surveying voyages of H.M.S. Adventure and Beagle in 1839.

Answer 448: Geography & Nature -- Briefer Birth

c) Hippopotamus

A hippo's pregnancy lasts from seven to eight months.

Answer 449: Literature & Arts -- Borrowed by Bradbury

c) The Golden Apples of the Sun

Yeats rhymed, "And pluck till time and times are done / The silver apples of the moon, / The golden apples of the sun."

Answer 450: Sports & Games -- Distant Second

d) Ron Francis

His 1,222 assists do not even approach two-thirds of Gretzky's 1,963.

Thursday, April 12, 2007

General Trivia Questions #445-450

Question 445: Entertainment & Food -- Buffalo, Definitely Buffalo Wings

In what city does the 1987 movie Wings of Desire take place?

a) Berlin, Germany
b) Budapest, Hungary
c) Moscow, Russia
d) Palermo, Italy

Question 446: History & Government -- Ful-phil-ling Function

Which U.S. President was also the first civilian governor of the Philippines?

a) Theodore Roosevelt
b) William McKinley
c) William Taft
d) Woodrow Wilson

Question 447: Math & Science -- Evolving Theory

On what ship did Charles Darwin begin formulating his theory of evolution in the 1830s?

a) Beagle
b) Bernard
c) Labrador
d) Retriever

Question 448: Geography & Nature -- Briefer Birth

Which is the only mammal below that has an average gestation period shorter than a human?

a) Ass
b) Elephant
c) Hippopotamus
d) Whale

Question 449: Literature & Arts -- Borrowed by Bradbury

What Ray Bradbury novel's title comes from William Butler Yeats's "The Song of Wandering Aengus"?

a) Dandelion Wine
b) Dark Carnival
c) The Golden Apples of the Sun
d) A Medicine for Melancholy

Question 450: Sports & Games -- Distant Second

What NHL player trails only Wayne Gretzky in career assists?

a) Mark Messier
b) Paul Coffey
c) Ray Bourque
d) Ron Francis

General Trivia Answers #439-444

Answer 439: Entertainment & Food -- Stay a While

d) John Lennon

The former Beatle was fighting deportation at the time.

Answer 440: History & Government -- Delivery Delay

c) UPS

The strike lasted fifteen days.

Answer 441: Math & Science -- Mix Silver

b) Copper

Coins are commonly about 10% copper while sterling silver is usually 7.5% copper.

Answer 442: Geography & Nature -- Skydot

b) Chicago, Illinois

The Home Insurance Building opened in 1883.

Answer 443: Literature & Arts -- The Death of Macbeth

c) Macduff

Macbeth misunderstood the prophecy that he could not be killed by a "man of woman born", as Macduff had arrived in the world through a Caesarean section.

Answer 444: Sports & Games -- Art of Choke

b) Jana Novotna

The Czech serve-and-volleyer was infamous for choking away big leads in important matches, such as the 1993 Wimbledon final where she was serving at 4-1, 40-15 in the third.

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

General Trivia Questions #439-444

Question 439: Entertainment & Food -- Stay a While

To whom did Neil Sedaka dedicate his song "The Immigrant"?

a) Albert Einstein
b) Andrew Carnegie
c) Bela Karolyi
d) John Lennon

Question 440: History & Government -- Delivery Delay

Which delivery service was crippled by a strike on August 3, 1997?

a) AirBorne
b) FedEx
c) UPS
d) U.S. Postal Service

Question 441: Math & Science -- Mix Silver

What metal is alloyed with silver to make coins and jewelry?

a) Aluminum
b) Copper
c) Lead
d) Tin

Question 442: Geography & Nature -- Skydot

In what city was the first U.S. skyscraper built?

a) Boston, Massachusetts
b) Chicago, Illinois
c) New York, New York
d) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Question 443: Literature & Arts -- The Death of Macbeth

What Shakespeare character murdered Macbeth?

a) Banquo
b) Donalbain
c) Macduff
d) Malcom

Question 444: Sports & Games -- Art of Choke

What female tennis player finally won her first Grand Slam singles title at Wimbledon in 1998 after several near misses?

a) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario
b) Jana Novotna
c) Mary Pierce
d) Venus Williams

General Trivia Answers #433-438

Answer 433: Entertainment & Food -- From Vinyl to Celluloid

a) George Harrison

The singer and guitarist made an uncredited appearance as Mr. Papadopolous.

Answer 434: History & Government -- Barn Burner

b) Cow

Although legend holds that Mrs. O'Leary's cow kicked over a lantern, no proof exists.

Answer 435: Math & Science -- Avogadro, Not Avocado

c) A mole

6.02 times 1023 molecules comprise a mole.

Answer 436: Geography & Nature -- First State

b) Alaska

AK just edges Alabama's AL.

Answer 437: Literature & Arts -- Rawlings' Yearling

b) A deer

A 1946 movie version starring Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman won two minor Oscar awards.

Answer 438: Sports & Games -- Don't Break 'Em

b) Ivory

Phenolic resin is mainly used now.

Tuesday, April 10, 2007

General Trivia Questions #433-438

Question 433: Entertainment & Food -- From Vinyl to Celluloid

What Beatle had a role in the 1979 movie Monty Python's Life of Brian?

a) George Harrison
b) John Lennon
c) Paul McCartney
d) Ringo Starr

Question 434: History & Government -- Barn Burner

What type of animal supposedly started the great Chicago fire on October 8, 1871?

a) Cat
b) Cow
c) Dog
d) Horse

Question 435: Math & Science -- Avogadro, Not Avocado

In chemistry, what is Avogadro's number also known as?

a) A crow
b) A gopher
c) A mole
d) A snake

Question 436: Geography & Nature -- First State

Which U.S. state's two-letter postal abbreviation comes first alphabetically?

a) Alabama
b) Alaska
c) Arizona
d) Arkansas

Question 437: Literature & Arts -- Rawlings' Yearling

What type of animal is the title character of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings 1938 book The Yearling?

a) A cow
b) A deer
c) A horse
d) A pig

Question 438: Sports & Games -- Don't Break 'Em

Before composition billiard balls existed, what were the spheroids usually made from?

a) Clay
b) Ivory
c) Stone
d) Wood

General Trivia Answers #427-432

Answer 427: Entertainment & Food -- Lead Lucas Line

a) C-3PO

The protocol android shrieks to R2-D2, "Did you hear that? They've shut down the main reactor. We'll be destroyed for sure. This is madness!"

Answer 428: History & Government -- Powder Blue President

c) James Polk

The Napoleon of the Stump was born in the state in 1795, although his family moved to Tennessee when he was eleven years old.

Answer 429: Math & Science -- Sphere of Flying

d) Troposphere

The clouds hang out there.

Answer 430: Geography & Nature -- Believe in Stephen

b) Hungary

King Stephen I, the first king of the country from about 975 to 1038, was named for the saint.

Answer 431: Literature & Arts -- Roman Spring o' Stone

c) Tennessee Williams

The traveling shoe salesman's son did not return to the format until Moise and the World of Reason a quarter century later.

Answer 432: Sports & Games -- Not Counting Flooded Basements

b) England

The pool was built at Goodman's Fields in London.

Monday, April 9, 2007

General Trivia Questions #427-432

Question 427: Entertainment & Food -- Lead Lucas Line

Which major character speaks first in the movie Star Wars?

a) C-3PO
b) Han Solo
c) Luke Skywalker
d) Princess Leia

Question 428: History & Government -- Powder Blue President

Who was the only U.S. President to graduate from the University of North Carolina?

a) Andrew Jackson
b) Andrew Johnson
c) James Polk
d) Woodrow Wilson

Question 429: Math & Science -- Sphere of Flying

Which part of the Earth's atmosphere is the jet stream located near the top of?

a) Mesosphere
b) Stratosphere
c) Thermosphere
d) Troposphere

Question 430: Geography & Nature -- Believe in Stephen

What country's patron saint is St. Stephen?

a) Belgium
b) Hungary
c) Netherlands
d) Switzerland

Question 431: Literature & Arts -- Roman Spring o' Stone

What playwright's first novel was The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone in 1950?

a) Arthur Miller
b) Eugene O'Neill
c) Tennessee Williams
d) Thornton Wilder

Question 432: Sports & Games -- Not Counting Flooded Basements

In what country was the first indoor swimming pool installed on May 28, 1742?

a) China
b) England
c) France
d) Spain

General Trivia Answers #421-426

Answer 421: Entertainment & Food -- Hynde Bite

d) "Talk of the Town"

The single reached #15 on the charts in the U.K. and #52 in the U.S.

Answer 422: History & Government -- Color-Coded Currency

c) White

The thread is blue in $5 bills, green in $20s, yellow in $50s, and red in $100s.

Answer 423: Math & Science -- Metal Meeting

c) Solution

It is a solution of carbon in iron.

Answer 424: Geography & Nature -- Edo Alter Ego

d) Tokyo, Japan

The name is also spelled Yedo.

Answer 425: Literature & Arts -- Something Borrowed

c) In Dubious Battle

Milton's phrase referred to Satan's rebellion against God.

Answer 426: Sports & Games -- Win King

b) Lenny Wilkens

The 1996 U.S. Olympic coach resigned from the New York Knicks on January 23, 2005 with 1,332 regular season wins, over 100 more than Riley.

Sunday, April 8, 2007

General Trivia Questions #421-426

Question 421: Entertainment & Food -- Hynde Bite

Which Pretenders' song's title is repeatedly sung at the end of the 1998 Garbage hit "Special"?

a) "Back on the Chain Gang"
b) "Brass in Pocket"
c) "My City Was Gone"
d) "Talk of the Town"

Question 422: History & Government -- Color-Coded Currency

When viewed under ultraviolet light, what color is the polymer security thread embedded in the new U.S. $10 bill?

a) Blue
b) Green
c) White
d) Yellow

Question 423: Math & Science -- Metal Meeting

Which chemistry term below best describes steel?

a) Compound
b) Element
c) Solution
d) Suspension

Question 424: Geography & Nature -- Edo Alter Ego

What city was known as Edo until 1869?

a) Angkor, Cambodia
b) Bangkok, Thailand
c) Seoul, Korea
d) Tokyo, Japan

Question 425: Literature & Arts -- Something Borrowed

What John Steinbeck novel's title comes from John Milton's Paradise Lost?

a) Cannery Row
b) The Grapes of Wrath
c) In Dubious Battle
d) Winter of Our Discontent

Question 426: Sports & Games -- Win King

What coach holds the NBA record for most career wins?

a) Dick Motta
b) Lenny Wilkens
c) Pat Riley
d) Red Auerbach

Smarter Than a 5th Grader - Random Trivia Answers

  • A1) Subtrahend. The original number is the minuend, and the result is called the difference.
  • A2) 4. A composite number is roughly the opposite of a prime number (every non-prime greater than 1 is a composite).
  • A3) Multiplication. The technique involves drawing a lattice (grid) with one factor across the top and the other down the side. Each product of two single digits goes into a cell split diagonally for the tens place and the ones place. Summing along the diagonals produces your final product. (Sorry, that was pretty hard to follow; here's a better explanation of the Lattice Method with pictures.)
  • A4) Reflex. An angle between 0 and 90 degrees is acute, 90 degrees is right, and between 90 and 180 is obtuse.
  • A5) Trapezoid. If two pairs of sides are parallel, you have a parallelogram. If two pairs of sides are of equal length but no sides are parallel, you have a kite. Oddly, there is no special term for a figure with four unequal sides and four unequal angles (roughly equivalent to a scalene triangle).
  • A6) Parabola. It is also the curve formed by the intersection of the surface of a cone and a plane parallel to one side of the cone.
  • A7) 540 degrees. The angles in a triangle add to 180 degrees, a quadrilateral to 360, and so on. If N is the number of sides in the polygon, the interior angles add up to 180(N-2).
  • A8) 16 cubic units. The volume is calculated as one-third of the area of the base times the height. Surprisingly, the shape of the base and the number of sides on the pyramid are irrelevant.
  • A9) 43,560. The funny number comes from an estimate of how much one yoke of oxen could plow in one day, multiplying a breadth of one chain (or four rods, or 66 feet) by one furlong (660 feet). An acre would cover an NFL football field from the back of one endzone to the opposite 20-yard line (or, if you prefer, from one 5-yard line to the other 5-yard line [plus another three-fourths of a yard to be exact]).
  • A10) 128. There are 8 fluid ounces in a cup, 2 cups in a pint, 2 pints in a quart, and 4 quarts in a gallon. And to complete the sequence on the small side, 2 tablespoons equal an ounce, and 3 teaspoons equal a tablespoon. Add a pinch or a dash at your discretion.
  • A11) 1 kilogram. By contrast, a gallon of water weighs 8.345 pounds (a quart equals 2.086 pounds), which is as round as your browser window.
  • A12) The order of operations in calculations. The first letters PEMDAS stand for Parentheses, Exponentiation, Multiplication and Division, and Addition and Subtraction.

Saturday, April 7, 2007

Smarter Than a 5th Grader - Random Trivia Questions

This week's themed quiz comes from information in the Everyday Mathematics Student Reference Book, which is targeted for 9- to 12-year-olds, so the questions actually range up to the sixth grade. To make it even harder, you have no choices to select from and no cheats (Google on your own guilty conscience). And sorry, no million-dollar prize this week; I spent my T.J. Maxx haul on Woot's April Fools' Day BOC (I didn't notice the coupon).

Smarter Than a 5th Grader Questions

  • Q1) Subtraction: What term refers to the number that you take away (i.e., what do you call B in the equation A - B = C)?
  • Q2) Whole Numbers: What is the lowest composite number?
  • Q3) Calculating: What operation would you use the lattice method to calculate?
  • Q4) Geometric Angles: What term refers to an angle greater than 180 degrees and less than 360 degrees?
  • Q5) Quadrilaterals: What do you call a quadrilateral with exactly one pair of parallel sides?
  • Q6) Geometric Shapes: In a plane, if you draw a line and a point off the line, what shape is formed by the set of points that are equidistant from the line and the point?
  • Q7) Polygons: What is the sum of the interior angles in a pentagon?
  • Q8) Pyramids: What is the volume of a pyramid whose base is 6 square units and whose height is 8 units?
  • Q9) Measurement of Area: How many square feet are in an acre?
  • Q10) Measurement of Volume: How many fluid ounces are in a gallon?
  • Q11) Metric System: What is the mass, in kilograms, of a liter of water (at 3.98 degrees Celsius, to be precise)?
  • Q12) Mystery Subject: Please excuse my dear Aunt Sally because she can't remember what?

Chinese Crunch Counter -- Quiz Quilt 14 Solution

Category Answers:
Entertainment
&
Food
DEBUSSYClaude Debussy's 1905 collection includes "Clair de Lune" (French for "Moonlight"), which was inspired by Paul Verlaine's poem by the same name.
Math
&
Science
URANIUMThe chemist also found zirconium and titanium.
History
&
Government
TOBACCOJohn Rolfe introduced a mild, Spanish variety to Jamestown in 1612.
Geography
&
Nature
JERUSALEMOriginally, the phrase referred only to the southeast corner of the city, where David constructed a fort.
Literature
&
Arts
GREENBERGJoanne Greenberg's novel was a bestseller in 1964. The world's largest rose garden is in Kazanluk, Bulgaria.
Sports
&
Games
FEDORAThe Dallas Cowboys honored him during the 2000-01 season with a picture of the soft, felt hat on their uniforms.

Quiz Quilt Answer: ABACUS (Sixth letters going up)

An abacus is ancient mechanical calculator.

Friday, April 6, 2007

Chinese Crunch Counter -- Quiz Quilt 14 Puzzle

Category Questions:
Entertainment
&
Food
What French composer, whose middle name was Achille, wrote the Suite Bergamesque?
Math
&
Science
What silvery, radioactive metal did Germany's Martin Klaproth discover in 1789?
History
&
Government
What was the main cash crop of the Virginia colony in the 18th century?
Geography
&
Nature
What is the City of David, not counting the place where he was born?
Literature
&
Arts
What author's book I Never Promised You a Rose Garden was turned into a movie in 1972?
Sports
&
Games
What type of hat was NFL coach Tom Landry famous for wearing on the sidelines?

General Trivia Answers #415-420

Answer 415: Entertainment & Food -- Half a Score

c) 1960s

Four of the ten awards went to musicals: West Side Story in 1961, My Fair Lady in 1964, The Sound of Music in 1965, and Oliver! in 1968.

Answer 416: History & Government -- All's Well That Ends Well

b) Jessica

In 1989, the event was made into the television movie Everybody's Baby: The Rescue of Jessica McClure.

Answer 417: Math & Science -- Area Apex

a) Circle

The area is equal to half of the perimeter times the radius.

Answer 418: Geography & Nature -- Caffeine Country

a) Brazil

Colombia is second.

Answer 419: Literature & Arts -- Those Wacky Thackerays

c) Makepeace

His most famous work was the 1848 satire Vanity Fair, a story revolving around the young ladies Becky Sharp and Amelia Sedley.

Answer 420: Sports & Games -- Not Up

a) Billie Jean King

Martina Navratilova is the only other player to reach the mark.

Thursday, April 5, 2007

General Trivia Questions #415-420

Question 415: Entertainment & Food -- Half a Score

In which decade did musicals win the most Best Picture Oscars?

a) 1940s
b) 1950s
c) 1960s
d) 1970s

Question 416: History & Government -- All's Well That Ends Well

On October 16, 1987, what 18-month-old baby girl was rescued from a twenty-foot well shaft in Midland, Texas, 58 hours after falling down?

a) Jennifer
b) Jessica
c) Jinny
d) Joanna

Question 417: Math & Science -- Area Apex

Given equal perimeter lengths, what geometric shape encloses the largest area?

a) Circle
b) Equilateral triangle
c) Right triangle
d) Square

Question 418: Geography & Nature -- Caffeine Country

What country produces the most coffee?

a) Brazil
b) Colombia
c) Indonesia
d) Vietnam

Question 419: Literature & Arts -- Those Wacky Thackerays

What was English novelist William Thackeray's middle name?

a) Dogood
b) Givelove
c) Makepeace
d) Takechance

Question 420: Sports & Games -- Not Up

Which female tennis player below did not win over 800 WTA singles matches in her career?

a) Billie Jean King
b) Chris Evert
c) Steffi Graf
d) Virginia Wade

General Trivia Answers #409-414

Answer 409: Entertainment & Food -- Fashion and Food

b) Cindy Crawford

Naomi Campbell also helped start the chain restaurants in 1995.

Answer 410: History & Government -- Not His Jogging Partner

a) Calvin Coolidge

When Harding died from food poisoning and pneumonia, Coolidge ascended to the Presidency on August 3, 1923, and he was elected to a full term in 1924.

Answer 411: Math & Science -- Bug Spray

a) Ants

Ray distilled the acid from dead red ants.

Answer 412: Geography & Nature -- Azores Day Tours

c) Portugal

The archipelago is in the Atlantic Ocean, 930 miles from Lisbon.

Answer 413: Literature & Arts -- Pruned Prayer

b) Luke 11:2-4

The prayer begins, "Our Father, who art in Heaven, hallowed be Thy Name. Thy Kingdom come, Thy Will be done, on Earth, as it is in Heaven."

Answer 414: Sports & Games -- Touchdown Tosser

b) Johnny Unitas

From 1956 to 1973, Mr. Football threw 290 career touchdown passes, all but the final three with the Baltimore Colts.

Wednesday, April 4, 2007

General Trivia Questions #409-414

Question 409: Entertainment & Food -- Fashion and Food

Which of the following supermodels was not one of the founders of the Fashion Cafe?

a) Christy Turlington
b) Cindy Crawford
c) Claudia Schiffer
d) Elle McPherson

Question 410: History & Government -- Not His Jogging Partner

Who was Warren Harding's 1920 running mate?

a) Calvin Coolidge
b) Charles Curtis
c) Charles Dawes
d) Herbert Hoover

Question 411: Math & Science -- Bug Spray

From which creatures did English naturalist John Ray first obtain formic acid in 1671?

a) Ants
b) Snakes
c) Spiders
d) Wasps

Question 412: Geography & Nature -- Azores Day Tours

Which country owns the Azores?

a) England
b) France
c) Portugal
d) United States

Question 413: Literature & Arts -- Pruned Prayer

Which item below is an abbreviated form of the other three choices?

a) Lord's Prayer
b) Luke 11:2-4
c) Matthew 6:9-13
d) Pater Noster

Question 414: Sports & Games -- Touchdown Tosser

What NFL quarterback held the career touchdown record before Fran Tarkenton?

a) George Blanda
b) Johnny Unitas
c) Len Dawson
d) Sonny Jurgensen

General Trivia Answers #403-408

Answer 403: Entertainment & Food -- Easy As 1, 2, 3

d) none of the above

The group chose the letters just to be near the beginning of the alphabet.

Answer 404: History & Government -- Act of Nature-alization

b) 5 years

The official name is the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Answer 405: Math & Science -- At the Earth's Core

c) Nickel

Silicon is the only other element present in significant quantities.

Answer 406: Geography & Nature -- The Chuck Yeager of Bugs

b) Dragonfly

The insectivore, which is harmless to humans, flies about twenty miles per hour, fifty percent speedier than the hornet.

Answer 407: Literature & Arts -- Founding Father

c) Abraham

The direct descendant of Noah is also considered to be the father of Islam and Christianity.

Answer 408: Sports & Games -- She-Shooter

b) Jackie Stiles

The shooting guard scored 3,393 points at Southwest Missouri State from 1997-98 to 2000-01.

Tuesday, April 3, 2007

General Trivia Questions #403-408

Question 403: Entertainment & Food -- Easy As 1, 2, 3

What does the new wave band ABC's name stand for?

a) Abysmally Bad Concoction
b) Alphabet Band City
c) Another Band from Chesterfield
d) none of the above

Question 404: History & Government -- Act of Nature-alization

How many years of residency does the McCarran-Walter Act of 1952 require for U.S. naturalization?

a) 3 years
b) 5 years
c) 7 years
d) 9 years

Question 405: Math & Science -- At the Earth's Core

What is the main chemical element in the Earth's core besides iron?

a) Chromium
b) Copper
c) Nickel
d) Strontium

Question 406: Geography & Nature -- The Chuck Yeager of Bugs

What is the fastest flying insect?

a) Bee
b) Dragonfly
c) Hornet
d) Horsefly

Question 407: Literature & Arts -- Founding Father

According to the Old Testament, who was the progenitor of the Hebrews and the founder of Judaism?

a) Aaron
b) Abel
c) Abraham
d) Absalom

Question 408: Sports & Games -- She-Shooter

What female basketball player holds the NCAA Division I record for career points?

a) Chamique Holdsclaw
b) Jackie Stiles
c) Lorri Bauman
d) Patricia Hoskins

General Trivia Answers #397-402

Answer 397: Entertainment & Food -- Rock Mrs. Water Sounds

b) "I Am a Rock"

The single peaked at #3 in 1966.

Answer 398: History & Government -- War of Yore

b) U.S. Civil War

The late summer battles near Sharpsburg, Maryland culminated with the loss of 4,800 lives in the bloody Battle of Antietam on September 17, 1862.

Answer 399: Math & Science -- Alvinometer: Measures Chipmunks

b) Electric current

The device uses magnetism to gauge the current.

Answer 400: Geography & Nature -- Bugs Bunny's Buddy

c) Marsupial

The vicious fifteen to twenty-pound native of Tasmania is the largest carnivorous marsupial.

Answer 401: Literature & Arts -- Deep Thoughts

d) Rene Descartes

His 1637 treatise Discourse on Method first claimed "I think, therefore I am" in French (Je pense, donc je suis).

Answer 402: Sports & Games -- Edge Wedge

c) Green

American roulette wheels also have a green double-zero to increase the house's advantage further.

Monday, April 2, 2007

General Trivia Questions #397-402

Question 397: Entertainment & Food -- Rock Mrs. Water Sounds

What is the only song below that was not a #1 hit for Simon and Garfunkel?

a) "Bridge Over Troubled Water"
b) "I Am a Rock"
c) "Mrs. Robinson"
d) "The Sounds of Silence"

Question 398: History & Government -- War of Yore

Which war was the Antietam Campaign part of?

a) Korean War
b) U.S. Civil War
c) Vietnam War
d) World War I

Question 399: Math & Science -- Alvinometer: Measures Chipmunks

What does a galvanometer measure?

a) Altitude
b) Electric current
c) Humidity
d) Wind speed

Question 400: Geography & Nature -- Bugs Bunny's Buddy

What type of animal is the Tasmanian Devil?

a) Cat
b) Dog
c) Marsupial
d) Rodent

Question 401: Literature & Arts -- Deep Thoughts

What French philosopher, mathematician, and scientist asserted, "Cogito, ergo sum"?

a) Albert Camus
b) Francois Voltaire
c) Jean-Paul Sartre
d) Rene Descartes

Question 402: Sports & Games -- Edge Wedge

What color is the zero slot on a roulette wheel?

a) Black
b) Blue
c) Green
d) Red

General Trivia Answers #391-396

Answer 391: Entertainment & Food -- Amazing Amadeus

d) Wrote his first symphony

The prodigy needed another four years to compose Bastien and Bastienne, his first opera.

Answer 392: History & Government -- Old Organization

d) YWCA

It is about half a century older than the other three groups.

Answer 393: Math & Science -- First Fabricated Fiber

c) Pyroxylin

The nitrocellulose was patented in 1855 and is used for artificial silk, leather, and oilcloth.

Answer 394: Geography & Nature -- Show Me the Source

b) Montana

The tributary joins the Mississippi River just north of St. Louis.

Answer 395: Literature & Arts -- Wells-Taught

d) Thomas Huxley

The sci-fi author attended the Royal College of Science in London.

Answer 396: Sports & Games -- GI Woe

d) Right thumbnail

The action figure was introduced at the American International Toy Fair in New York on February 9, 1964.

Sunday, April 1, 2007

General Trivia Questions #391-396

Question 391: Entertainment & Food -- Amazing Amadeus

In 1764, which of the following was true of 8-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart?

a) Could play 7 musical instruments
b) Married his stepsister
c) Wrote Bastien and Bastienne
d) Wrote his first symphony

Question 392: History & Government -- Old Organization

Which is the oldest of the following organizations?

a) Camp Fire Girls
b) 4-H Club
c) Girl Scouts of America
d) YWCA

Question 393: Math & Science -- First Fabricated Fiber

What was the first man-made fiber?

a) Lycra
b) Nylon
c) Pyroxylin
d) Rayon

Question 394: Geography & Nature -- Show Me the Source

In which U.S. state does the Missouri River begin?

a) Idaho
b) Montana
c) North Dakota
d) South Dakota

Question 395: Literature & Arts -- Wells-Taught

What scientist tutored H.G. Wells in college?

a) Charles Darwin
b) Charles Lyell
c) John Scopes
d) Thomas Huxley

Question 396: Sports & Games -- GI Woe

Which body part is misplaced on GI Joe dolls?

a) Left big toe
b) Left ear
c) Right knee
d) Right thumbnail

Happy Birthday - Random Trivia Answers

  • A1) The Beatles. Paul McCartney's composition (with help from John Lennon) was released in 1968 from The White Album. Yoko Ono, Linda Eastman, and Patti Harrison all sang backup.
  • A2) Good Morning to All. Patty and Mildred Hill composed the tune for their school in Louisville, Kentucky in 1893.
  • A3) Preston Ware Orem. The original song and lyrics are now in the public domain, but Orem's version reset the copyright clock 42 years later.
  • A4) Summy-Birchard Music. But also give yourself credit for AOL Time Warner, which owns the company. Thanks to the Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998, the copyright isn't set to expire until 2030. Rumors that Paul McCartney owns the copyright are no more accurate than the ones that claimed he died in 1969 (not Michael Jackson either even though he snatched the rights to many Beatles songs McCartney coveted).
  • A5) The Sultan of Brunei. Hassanal Bolkiah (born July 15, although the party was two days earlier) was once estimated to be the richest person in the world.
  • A6) 45. Monroe performed her famous rendition in front of over 15,000 people in Madison Square Garden on May 19, 1962.
  • A7) Futurama. On Nibbler's birthday, Fry adds, "And you smell like one, too" from the monkey variation of the standard birthday song.
  • A8) 80th. You'll also get one every decade thereafter.
  • A9) 13th. Girls celebrate their Bat Mitzvah one year earlier (it's all about maturity).
  • A10) The one that matches the day you were born. I wish I'd known that a decade ago, because it would have been special as the oldest possible golden birthday (and within a year of my turning a billion seconds old).
  • A11) August. Just over nine percent (9.07%) of Americans were born in August, and 8.80% were born in July. February, with the fewest days, is dead last at about 7.55%.
  • A12) October 5 (New Year's Eve conception). May 22 is the least common (summer heat?).